What We Do


Our Student Nutrition Programs work to improve the learning capacity, health and well-being of children by ensuring access to healthy food before, during or after school through school or community-based nutrition programs. At last count, there were 607 nutrition programs operating in the Central East Region, serving 78,125 children.

We bring together school and community resources so that children and youth have increased access to safe, nutritious, personally acceptable food that will optimize learning by offering three types of programs:

  • Snack - containing at least one serving from two food groups of Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating, with at least one serving from the Vegetables and Fruit group.
  • Breakfast - with at least one serving from a minimum of three food groups of Canada's Food guide to Healthy Eating with at least one serving from the Vegetables and Fruit food group and at least one serving from the Milk Products food group.
  • Lunch - with at least one serving from a minimum of three food groups of Canada's Food guide to Healthy Eating with at least one serving from the Vegetables and Fruit food group and at least one serving from the Milk Products food group.

We support Local Coordinators to help start and support programs by providing access, where possible, to:

  • Funding
  • Community volunteers
  • Food
  • Information on nutrition, menu planning and food safety
  • Networking opportunities with other school nutrition programs

Facts & Stats:

The percentage of children in Canada who reportedly do not consume breakfast has been estimated at anywhere from 6% to 42% (Source: Canadian Journal of Public Health, 2003)

Children who miss breakfast are compromised with regards to mathematics and reading ability, later morning problem-solving tasks and poor behaviour. (Pollitt 1981, Pollitt 1983, Pollitt 1995)

The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Canadian children has doubled in the past 20 years. (Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2000)

Hungry kids are seven times as likely to have behavioural problems as not hungry kids. (Albion Monitor)